Physics Department

Physics, Engineering Dual Degree and Atmospheric Science Dual Degree Programs
 
Major & Minor Requirements
Engineering Dual-Degree Program
Atmospheric Science Dual-Degree Program

Courses

Off-Campus Internship & Research Opportunities
Science Network
Facilities &
Scientific Computing
Student & Faculty Research
Alumni
Faculty
This Week's Physics Problem!

The "Evil Eye Galaxy"

NASA's Astronomy Picture of the Day

Welcome to the Department of Physics Home Page


News!

We are deeply saddened by the loss of our friend and colleague,

Dr. Charles "Bud" Skov.

Bud was a wonderful teacher and colleague and we will miss him dearly.

Congratulations to our 2014 Physics Graduates

Cyrus Turner, Matt Anderson, Corbin Peterson, Jared Johnson, Stefan Flynn,

Gage DeCook and Don Daugherty

Visit our Facebook Group at MC Physics


Physics is the study of the fundamental laws and forces that govern how the universe works. The goal of this exciting discipline is to understand how the world works at its most basic and fundamental levels and to understand the complexities that arise from the fundamental laws.

Every physicist learns how to solve problems. But physicists also need to speak and write clearly and concisely (to describe their ideas to others), and to be able work with others to engage in the creative process of finding new ways of approaching problems. Physics is firmly ensconced in the tradition of "liberal" education.

Physicists have applied both their understanding of the laws of nature and the techniques that they have developed to all kinds of fields, including engineering, finance, biology and medicine. Many of the technologies that you enjoy every day came from the hard work of physicists. You will find physics educated individuals in all walks of life and in all professions, because an education in Physics is excellent preparation for problem solving, critical thinking, and communicating. Physicists like to think that in short time, they can learn and do anything--and for the most part--they can!

Physics students at Monmouth learn how to form interesting questions, develop models, construct analytical and computational solutions, and apply those skills to all kinds of interesting systems. Our small classes and our close relationship to our students make for an excellent educational experience. We know our students well and we work closely with them to engage them in all kinds of activities, including lecture, lab, undergraduate research, and independent projects. We have the ability to tailor our class offerings and projects to the interests of our students.

Many of our Physics students participate in our "Dual Degree Program"--a program where a student spends 3 or 4 years at Monmouth, usually majoring in Physics, and then studying engineering at one of the campuses that we have cooperative agreements with. Right now, we have cooperative agreements with Washington University, Case Western Reserve University, and the University of Southern California. Upon completing his or her studies in engineering, a student receives a B.A. in his or her major from Monmouth and a B.S. in Engineering from the university where they studied engineering.

Physics is a challenging major that will give you the ability to pursue a career in almost any field that you can imagine. We would love to have you visit with us to talk about how physics at Monmouth College might be the right field for you.

About Physicists and Physics

Physicists divide themselves into three groups. Theoretical Physicists use mathematics to try to understanding existing theories of how nature works, to make qualitative and quantitative predictions to compare to experiments, and to construct new theories and models. Experimental Physicists design, build, and do experiments to test existing understandings of the universe and to discover new characteristics of the universe. Computational Physicists construct computational simulations and of physical systems to study them.

Some interesting sites about studying physics are

 
Major & Minor Requirements
Engineering Dual-Degree Program
Atmospheric Science Dual-Degree Program

Courses

Off-Campus Internship & Research Opportunities
Science Network
Facilities &
Scientific Computing
Student & Faculty Research
Alumni
Faculty
This Week's Physics Problem!

Mail To Webmaster: Christopher G. Fasano